Mobilizing the nation’s teacher educators to embrace preparation program transformation: 2nd national summit being planned.
 
Leaders of a dozen national organizations committed to high quality educator preparation are meeting in Atlanta on February 16th to lay the foundation for a second national summit on redefining teacher education for digital age learners.  At the invitational summit, to be held in the coming year, it is expected that 100 thought leaders will develop specific action plans by which the collaborating national associations, state and federal policy makers, corporate partners and others can concertedly mobilize and engage the nation’s teacher educators to address together the imperatives of digital age learners, schools and skills.
 
Watch this site for links to resources and initiatives being undertaken by the collaborating national partners.

 

Hosted by the Learning Technology Center, College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin.Promethean

Made possible through a generous gift from the Promethean Foundation.

The Invitational Summit is the work of a distinguished group of educational leaders and organizations representing a broad spectrum of stakeholder groups and perspectives.

Summit Chairs

Tom Carroll—President, National Commission on Teaching and America's Future (NCTAF)

Paul Resta—Ruth Knight Millikan Professorship in Instructional Technology and Director, Learning Technology Center, College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin

Steering Committee

Karen Bruett—Senior Director of Marketing and Strategic Alliances, Council of Chief State School Officers

Tom Burnett—National Manager of Strategic Initiatives, Apple Computer, Inc.

Jim Cibulka—President, National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)

Chris Dede—Timothy E. Wirth Professor in Learning Technologies, Harvard Graduate School of Education, Harvard University

Don Knezek—Executive Director, International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

Gerald Knezek—President, Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education (SITE)

Keith R. Krueger—CEO, Consortium for School Networking (CoSN)

Doug Levin—Executive Director, State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA)

Timothy J. Magner—Vice President of Keystone for KC Distance Learning

Kristen McLaughlin—Director, Global Educator Strategy and Programs, Microsoft Corporation

Robert McLaughlin—Professional Educator Preparation Program Approval, New Hampshire Department of Education

Susan Patrick—President and CEO, The International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL)

David Ritchey—Executive Director, Association of Teacher Educators

Jim Vanides—Worldwide Education Strategy, HP Global Social Investment, Hewlett-Packard

Maria Vasquez—Senior Manager, Strategic Initiatives and National Funding, Promethean

Rob WeilDeputy Director, Educational Issues Department at the American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO (AFT)

Snow WhiteManager, Global Professional Learning Strategy, Dell Inc. and Strategic Council Support, Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21)

We should be preparing educators for the schools we need rather than the schools we have.

Teacher education is a complex system. Many contributors are involved, including state legislatures, state certification boards, national and regional accreditation associations, educational professional associations, teacher unions, teacher education institutions, schools, and the federal government.


Most of these stakeholders agree that teacher education needs to change to meet the needs of digital age learners and the challenges of a rapidly changing knowledge and technology-based global society. But diverse policy contexts and a lack of shared vision pose barriers to collaborative action among the stakeholders to affect change. Although there are isolated islands of innovation and excellence in educator professional development, concerted and coordinated action by all stakeholder groups is needed to take them to scale.


There have been extensive, prolonged national discussions about moving teacher education and our schools out of the industrial age and into the knowledge age. Over 100 key education stakeholders met in December 2009 with the understanding that now is the time to segue from talk to action. This diverse group spent two intensive days progressing through a series of carefully crafted large- and small-group workshops leading to the development of and consensus around a new vision for teacher education in the digital age. This vision, along with a series of subsequent meetings, led to a set of policy recommendations at the institutional, state, and national levels that would facilitate the redefinition of educator preparation in our rapidly changing technology- and knowledge-based global society. Representatives of this group presented their recommendations to Congress and the full report is available to the public.    

Summit Report—Redefining Teacher Education for Digital Age Learners

Convening Organizations

American Federation of Teachers, AFL-CIO (AFT)

Association of Teacher Educators (ATE)

Consortium for School Networking (CoSN)

Council of Chief State School Officers (CCSSO)

International Association for K-12 Online Learning (iNACOL)

International Society for Technology in Education (ISTE)

Learning Technology Center, College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin

National Commission on Teaching and America’s Future (NCTAF)

National Council for Accreditation of Teacher Education (NCATE)

Partnership for 21st Century Skills (P21)

Society for Information Technology in Teacher Education (SITE)

State Educational Technology Directors Association (SETDA)

Proceeds may be used in general support of the College of Education, The University of Texas at Austin.